Tag Archives: climate policy

In Germany, one billion euros of government money go a long way

December 13, 2012 |

 

One of the major themes coming out of Doha at the UNFCCC Conference of Parties last week was the role of climate finance. Basically, if we want to reduce emissions and scale up renewable energy and energy saving measures, we need to figure out where the money to do these things will come from.

With public budgets strapped, this challenge increasingly becomes about how we can direct limited public funds to unlock private investment in a targeted, effective way.

In Germany, a recent CPI study showed that 1.5% of GDP, or 37 billion Euros, is invested in climate-related activities like renewable energy and energy efficiency. More than 95% of that investment comes from businesses and households. This small share of government spending is striking. However, it would be wrong to conclude that the government plays no role.

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Policy Watch: UN climate talks wrap up, Indonesia approves landmark forest protection deal, and Africa’s largest solar plant close to breaking ground

December 11, 2012 |

 

This week, climate policy headlines from around the world include results from the UN climate talks, Indonesia approving a conservation deal that will protect 200,000 acres of forest, and Norway contributing $180 million to help Brazil slow deforestation.

Elinor Benami, Chiara Trabacchi, and Xueying Wang contributed headlines to this edition of Policy Watch.

UN climate talks extend Kyoto Protocol, promise compensation
The summit established for the first time that rich nations should move towards compensating poor nations for losses due to climate change. Developing nations hailed it as a breakthrough, but condemned the gulf between the science of climate change and political attempts to tackle it.

The deal, agreed by nearly 200 nations, extends to 2020 the Kyoto Protocol. It is the only legally-binding plan for combating global warming. The deal covers Europe and Australia, whose share of world greenhouse gas emissions is less than 15%.

But the conference also cleared the way for the Kyoto protocol to be replaced by a new treaty binding all rich and poor nations together by 2015 to tackle climate change. The final text “encourages” rich nations to mobilize at least $10bn (£6bn) a year up to 2020, when the new global climate agreement is due to kick in. Full article.

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Expanding green finance: What’s already working and what’s next?

December 5, 2012 |

 

Despite reaching $364 billion in 2010/2011, global investment to combat climate change still falls far short of the level required to stabilize global temperature rise to 2°C. According to the IEA, we need to reach $1 trillion each year of incremental investment in energy supply and demand technologies, and more will be needed to achieve climate resilient development globally.

Policymakers and others will need to scale up what’s working, and explore new approaches to pool more capital from the private sector. However, investors’ real and perceived risks are increasing as a result of stalled international negotiations and national policy frameworks reforms.

On the 20th and the 21st September, Climate Policy Initiative hosted the Second Meeting of the San Giorgio Group (SGG) on the island of San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice to discuss what’s already working in green finance, what’s not working, and to identify new options to bridge the gap between supply of climate investment and the demand for mitigation and adaptation finance. Here is a summary of some of the highlights.

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Keeping track of climate progress: Are countries well-placed to meet new tracking needs?

November 27, 2012 |

 

As the business school adage goes, you manage what you measure.

When it comes to progress on climate change, measurement doesn’t often capture much public attention. However, measurement and reporting play a fundamental behind-the-scenes role: They help build confidence that countries are doing what they say, and they also build capacity for countries to identify opportunities and tackle challenges domestically.

Right now, climate negotiators are gathering in Doha for the 18th Conference of the Parties (COP 18) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). While headlines around these meetings usually focus on the lack of progress in UNFCCC discussions of countries’ emissions reduction targets, the UNFCCC is making strides on other fronts. In the past three years, countries have agreed to significantly expand the amount of information they report on their greenhouse gas emissions and their climate policies and measures.

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Policy Watch: Companies ask for a clear carbon price, US on track to become world’s largest oil producer, and Australia ready to back Kyoto Protocol

November 19, 2012 |

 

This week, climate policy headlines from around the world include Australia’s decision to back the Kyoto Protocol’s second phase, companies like Shell and Unilever calling for a carbon price, and a report that puts a $527 billion price tag on the U.K.’s low-carbon energy sector needs.

Uday Varadarajan and Chiara Trabacchi contributed headlines to this edition of Policy Watch.

Shell, Unilever Lead 100 Companies Calling for CO2 Price
Royal Dutch Shell Plc (RDSA) joined Unilever NV (UNA) and more than 100 companies calling for lawmakers worldwide to put a “clear” price on carbon emissions in order to contain global warming.

Companies invest trillions of dollars in energy and infrastructure projects, and, in most cases, don’t consider goals to cut greenhouse gases, the companies said today in a statement that’s due to be presented to European Commissioner for Climate Action Connie Hedegaard in Brussels.

“A clear, stable, ambitious and cost-effective policy framework is essential to underpin the investment needed to deliver substantial greenhouse gas emissions reductions by mid- century,” the companies said in the e-mailed statement. “Putting a clear, transparent and unambiguous price on carbon emissions must be a core policy objective.” Full article.

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Policy Watch: Japan cuts emissions, Brazil responds to deforestation, and Europe faces a looming energy transmission headache

October 17, 2012 |

 

This week, climate policy headlines from around the world included Japan cutting emissions, Brazil responding to a spike in deforestation, and waves that could supply 11% of the UK’s power.

Rodney Boyd, Elinor Benami, and Brendan Pierpont contributed headlines to this edition of Policy Watch.

Japan may meet Kyoto emissions cut target, ministry estimates
Japan is on target to cut greenhouse gas emissions by an estimated average of 8 percent for the five years ending in March, meaning it will meet commitments under the Kyoto Protocol, the environment ministry estimated.

Kyoto’s binding obligations limiting the release of emissions among industrial nations stipulate Japan must cut greenhouse gas output by 6 percent from 1990 levels for fiscal 2008-2012. Emissions are projected to be 1.277 billion metric tons for fiscal 2011 and 1.316 billion tons in the twelve months ending March 31, 2013, Kentaro Doi, a ministry official in charge of emissions data, said by phone. Full article.

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