Tag Archives: innovation

From Talking the Talk to Walking the Walk on Climate Finance

April 18, 2016 |

 

After Paris – The need to move from talk to action

The Paris Agreement reached by 194 countries at the COP21 Climate Summit in December 2015 marks a historic turning point in a 20-year conversation about how to tackle climate change. Up to this point, there have been examples of incremental progress, though the overarching policy ambition necessary to curb climate change have been slow to come. The need to act is urgent in order to keep global temperature rise to ‘well below 2 degrees C,’ the stated goal of the Paris Agreement.

How to finance the transition to a low-carbon and climate-resilient world is a challenging question, especially for developing countries, which often lack the policy and financial capacity needed to spur the necessary investment.

Climate Finance

Since 2009, developed countries have been working to scale up climate finance for developing nations, with a goal to mobilize USD 100 billion per year from multiple sources. The good news is that investment is growing – especially in key emerging economies such as China. According to the Global Landscape of Climate Finance, 2015 saw the largest amount of climate-related investment to date, with USD 391 billion of finance flowing to mitigation and adaption globally. In the lead up to Paris, the OECD, in collaboration with CPI found that countries are well on their way to achieving this goal, with an average of USD 57 billion of mobilized climate finance flowing from developed to developing countries in 2013-14.

While progress is certainly being made, the IEA estimates that approximately USD 16.5 trillion will be required from 2015-2030 to re-orient global systems to a scenario consistent with a sub 2-degree future. The need to pick up the pace and move from talk to the most concrete of actions is what defines the post-Paris world. The challenge of bridging this gap is profound, and will require concerted efforts from private and public actors, households around the world, and civil society. It will require an understanding of the actual barriers faced by all types and classes of investors, and the use of public policies and finance to minimize these. This in turn necessitates political will, robust technical analysis, and above all, innovation.

Crowdsourcing Innovation for Climate Finance

The Global Innovation Lab for Climate Finance (The Lab) supports efforts to leverage investment flows to the developing world to speed up the transition to a low-carbon future by identifying, developing and piloting new financial instruments and public-private partnerships designed to overcome barriers, maximize impact, and attract private sector capital. The Lab crowd-sources ideas from the global climate finance community, including private and public investors, financial institutions, technical experts, and policy makers. Then, incorporating the guidance of a diverse set of advisors and external experts, the Lab develops, stress-tests, and refines the best of these ideas into innovative, instruments with financial backing for concrete pilots on the ground.

The approach is simple – solving the climate finance challenge, and addressing climate change on a broader level, will require bold collaboration and innovation that spans actors and sectors. Successful pilots can be scaled to incorporate larger investments, new investors, other sectors and geographies.

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How to spread new technology in agriculture: the importance of geographic conditions and learning-from-peers

November 7, 2013 |

 

In business, it is unusual to find a technology that proves to be better and costs less than the one in use. In theory, that technology should spread like wildfire and quickly replace current production methods. If it doesn’t, there is usually a barrier that prevents its spread.

In a new CPI study, we examine a farming technology called the Direct Planting System (DPS) which has proven to be one of the most important developments in agriculture in the past decades – however, after nearly forty years of its introduction in Southern Brazil, only 10% of Brazilian farmers reported using it in the 2006 Agricultural Census. The questions we address in this study are: What is keeping this technology from spreading and how do we overcome this barrier?

Our analysis reveals that soil composition is an important factor affecting the spread of the DPS. When soils are similar in a given municipality, it is easier for farmers to learn from the experience of peers who have already successfully adopted the system. Likewise, differences in the soil can act as a barrier to the expansion of DPS, since the system would have to be adapted to different soils. 

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What’s Next for Green Growth?

October 22, 2012 |

 

For a long time, international climate negotiations have been viewed as the cornerstone of global efforts to both curb climate change and support green growth. But the assumptions that launched the negotiations 20 years ago no longer hold true. New economies have grown in size and standing; they are no longer interested in following, but in leading. This is reflected on the ground as negotiations fail to make progress at the scale and pace that the climate challenge requires.

Despite lackluster progress towards a global accord, there are bright spots all over the world. Emerging nations such as China, Brazil, Indonesia, and India have been working seriously to explore the transition to clean economies. Many developed nations have taken a leadership role in reducing emissions or pursuing clean energy, are exploring innovative policies, and are supporting efforts of developing nations.

If we pay attention and learn from these bright spots, we may find that there are productive opportunities to advance our goals, and that in fact, there may be opportunities to reframe negotiations to build from these efforts.

At CPI we see three important ways to advance the next phase of green growth. And as an organization dedicated to finding and fast-tracking effective climate policies, we’re supporting all three around the world:

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Thomas Heller: The new world order is green

January 13, 2012 |

 

This interview is from SEE magazine on newsstands in Brazil. Translated from the Portuguese by Climate Policy Initiative.

Thomas C. Heller, Stanford Law Professor, one of the world's most renowned advisors in environmental policy, says that emerging countries will lead the transition to a more sustainable economy

The new world order is green

Veja, January 13, 2012

Professor Thomas C. Heller, Climate Policy Initiative and Stanford University, is one of the world’s most influential experts on environmental policy. A member of the UN panel of experts who estimated the effects of climate change and shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with former Vice President Al Gore, Professor Heller has been asked to assist in the formulation of sustainability programs in ten out of ten emerging countries. His pragmatic approach is music to the ears of governments in Brazil, China, and Indonesia. The Chinese plan to reduce carbon emissions and the Brazilian law that cut transfers of federal funds to municipalities that deforest are examples of programs  that  Climate Policy Initiative, a nonprofit institution founded by Heller and funded by financier George Soros supported. Professor Heller says: “It is up to the emerging countries to lead the transition to a new world order where being sustainable will be a tremendous competitive advantage.”

 

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