Tag Archives: cost

Adjustments to Indian renewable energy policies could save up to 78% in subsidies

April 21, 2014 |

 

Recently, the Government of India announced plans to award licenses for an additional one gigawatt of solar in the next year – about half the capacity of the Hoover Dam and enough to meet the energy needs of two million people. This move is part of India’s already ambitious targets for renewable energy that aim to address rising energy demand, decrease the country’s dependence on fossil fuel imports, and mitigate climate change.

To ensure the country meets these targets, India provides a package of renewable energy support policies that includes state-level feed-in tariffs and federal subsidies, which are in the form of a generation based incentive – a per unit subsidy; viability gap funding – a capital grant; and accelerated depreciation.

However, given the ambitious goals, but limited budget in India, the cost-effectiveness of these policies is an important factor for policymakers.

Our recent study “Solving India’s Renewable Energy Financing Challenge: Which Federal Policies can be Most Effective?” took on the question of cost-effectiveness by comparing a range of policy alternatives to the status quo.

Our findings were striking. We found that a policy that both reduces the cost of debt and extends its tenor is the most cost-effective. In fact, for wind energy, reducing debt cost to 5.9% and extending tenor by 10 years can cut the cost of total federal and state support by up to 78%. For solar energy, which is more capital-intensive, reducing debt cost to 1.2% and extending tenor by 10 years can cut the cost of support by 28%.

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Supporting wind energy and saving U.S. taxpayers nearly $5 billion in three easy steps

December 18, 2012 |

 

CPI’s recent study, Supporting Renewables While Saving Taxpayers Money, showed that U.S. governments could save a lot of money by adjusting how tax incentives for renewable energy are delivered. In particular, we showed that a $21/MWh taxable cash incentive for production (TCP) for wind could provide the same support to wind projects as the current $22/MWh production tax credit (PTC) and almost halve the cost to federal and state governments.

US Government could save 4.5 billion by adjusting current wind policy

The PTC is set to expire at the end of this year. The Senate has proposed extending it by one year, but at a cost to government in excess of $12 billion – a heavy lift given budget constraints. Replacing the PTC with a TCP could reduce that cost to $7.5 billion. A similar reduction in cost would apply to any proposal to extend the PTC, including the recent proposal by the American Wind Energy Association to phase-out the PTC over six years.

How does this work?

Well, wind project developers have limited tax liabilities. That means that by themselves, most project developers can’t use federal tax benefits until years after they are received, eroding almost two thirds of the incentive value. In order to get more out of these incentives, project developers bring in outside investors who have greater tax liabilities. This is called tax-equity financing. However, tax equity financing is more expensive and complex than conventional finance, and erodes about a third of the incentive value.

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