Tag Archives: low-carbon

Powering climate action – the 2016 Fire winners

November 28, 2016 |

 

The Paris Agreement marks the start of a new era in climate policy, with commitments to climate action made by governments, private sector entities, and NGOs around the world. However, for these commitments to be realized and a corresponding transition to a 2-degree pathway achieved, trillions of investment will need to be mobilized – and quickly, with a significant portion coming from private sector sources.

Climate Policy Initiative (CPI) is at the forefront of work to respond to the urgency of the climate challenge by targeting scarce public resources to mobilize significant private finance into low-carbon, climate-resilient development. As part of its climate finance program, CPI serves as Secretariat to The Global Innovation Lab for Climate Finance (The Lab), which convenes public and private stakeholders to design, pilot, and accelerate transformative financial instruments, with the aim to drive billions of dollars of private investment into climate change mitigation and adaptation in developing countries.

The Lab and its initiatives have been endorsed by the G7 and have raised nearly USD 600 million in seed funding for renewable energy, energy efficiency, and climate resilience projects. Currently, the Lab is seeking ideas for its next cycle that can drive finance in India and Brazil. The Lab also presents The Fire Awards, which identify and accelerate powerful, early-stage pilots and businesses that can unlock private finance for clean energy and green growth around the world.

Indeed, in the six months following the Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) Future of Energy Summit in New York, there have already been several successful outcomes for the 2016 Fire Winners, which kicked-off implementation of work plans to achieve growth goals, with support of Fire Working Groups in May:

  • In September, the team behind Affordable Green Homes, a project to catalyze a market for affordable green housing in Sub-Saharan Africa, was invited to participate in the formal launch of a UN and private sector platform to generate financing solutions for the Sustainable Development Goals. At the launch meeting, led by UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon, International Housing Solutions (the global private equity firm leading Affordable Green Homes) was recognized for its innovative approach to drive investment in and deliver energy and water efficient housing. The team will continue to help shape the direction of the UNSG platform.
  • The Developing Harmonized Metrics for the PAYG Solar Industry initiative championed by Anna Lerner of the World Bank Group, also moves forward, achieving a major milestone with the recent publishing of a white paper titled, How can Pay-as-you-go Solar be Financed?. The paper, which was one of the main outputs of the Fire Working Group, explores a number of the risks and challenges associated with structured finance solutions for the PAYG sector. On 11th October, the paper was also presented and discussed in a dedicated session at the BNEF Future of Energy EMEA Summit in London. The session was led by Itamar Orlandi (Head of Applied Research, BNEF). Panelists included Fire Working Group Members, David Battley (Director of Structured Finance, SunFunder) and Peter Mockel (Senior Industry Specialist, Climate Business Department, IFC), as well as Giuseppe Artizzu (Head of Global Energy Strategy, Electro Power Systems Group), Mansoor Hamayun (Chief Executive Officer, BBOX), and Manoj Sinha (Co-Founder and CEO, Husk Power Systems). The white paper is available on the BNEF website.
  • An announcement was released on the planned scale-up of the Investor Confidence Project (ICP), an Environmental Defense Fund led initiative to standardize and increase investment in energy efficient buildings. The scale-up plan is founded on a new partnership with the Green Business Certification, Inc. (GBCI), which also administers the LEED, EDGE, PEER, WELL, SITES, GRESB, and Parksmart certification programs. The new partnership aims “to achieve a true, worldwide standard to unlock the potential of energy efficiency.” The Fire Secretariat will host a dedicated 2 hour roundtable in London on 7th December to discuss and build momentum for the new partnership. The roundtable will comprise Fire Working Group Members and key stakeholders in the investment and real estate sectors. If you would like to attend, please let us know at info@financeforresilience.com. More information on the new partnership is available on the ICP and decentralized energy
  • Finally, Grips, which provides reliable, clean energy beyond the world of fossil fuels and public grids, was supported by a Fire Working Group to make connections with over a dozen investors, which will help the initiative move forward. In recognition of its innovative approach to deliver competitive, clean energy to industrials in developing countries, Grips’ CEO, Alexander Voigt, was also invited to participate in the technical workshop to set up a UN-led platform to scale-up finance for the Sustainable Development Goals.

These achievements mark major milestones for the 2016 Fire Winners, as they continue to blaze forward and grow their impact. For those interested in learning more about any of the 2016 Fire Winners or to be involved in upcoming consultations, please contact us at info@financeforresilience.com.

“Getting access to international experts and advice made it possible to accelerate the launch of the KPI framework, grow our partner network and identify new useful applications for the data platform.” –Anna Lerner, World Bank Group

“Winning FiRe has clearly accelerated the implementation of Grips. Through the increased exposure to an international audience of financial and energy experts we have received an increasing number of project leads, partnership requests, and financing offers. We are currently advancing discussions on all sides.”–Arvid Seeberg-Elverfeldt, Grips

The Global Innovation Lab for Climate Finance identifies, develops, and pilots transformative climate finance instruments, with the aim to drive billions of dollars of private investment into climate change mitigation and adaptation in developing countries. Made up of public and private sector members, the Global Lab and its initiatives have been endorsed by the G7 and have raised nearly USD 600 million in seed funding for renewable energy, energy efficiency, and climate resilience projects.

The Fire Awards accelerate powerful, early-stage pilots and businesses that can unlock finance for clean energy and green growth. Climate Policy Initiative serves as the secretariat for the Fire Awards alongside the Global Innovation Lab for Climate Finance (The Lab). The Fire Awards and The Lab are funded in part by Bloomberg Philanthropies, and Bloomberg New Energy Finance provides in-kind support.

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A call for innovative green finance ideas to help India meet its climate goals

November 24, 2016 |

 

Last week, I was in Marrakesh speaking at this year’s UN climate change conference, COP22, where I witnessed an important transition in moving from talk to action. Just a few weeks before the start of COP22, the Paris Agreement officially entered into force – the historic international agreement for action on climate change that emerged from COP21 last year. While COP21 was about promises and commitments, COP22 was about working out the details to put those promises in place.

Under the Paris Agreement, India has pledged that renewable energy will be 40% of the country’s expected electricity generation capacity in 2030, along with a 35% reduction in carbon intensity by 2030 from 2005 levels. In addition, India has also set one of the most ambitious renewable energy targets of all – 175 GW of renewable energy by 2022, including 100 GW of solar power.  These important targets are not only good for the climate, but can also help meet the energy demand of India’s rapidly growing economy and population.

However, a lack of sufficient financing for renewable energy in India may present a formidable barrier to achieving these targets. This was a key item of discussion at COP22.

An upcoming report from Climate Policy Initiative shows that in order to meet the target of 175 GW of renewable energy by 2022, the renewable energy sector in India will require $189 billion in additional private investment, a significant amount. The potential amount of investment in the renewable energy sector in India is $411 billion, which is more than double the amount of investment required. However, in a realistic scenario, the amount of investment expected falls short of the amount required by around 30%, for both debt and equity.

A call for innovative green finance ideas - Potential equity and debt investments

In this context, and as India moves to implement its commitments under the Paris Agreement, the work of the India Innovation Lab for Green Finance is increasingly important. The India Lab is a public-private initiative that identifies, develops, and accelerates innovative finance solutions that are not only a better match with the needs of private investors, but that can also effectively leverage public finance to drive more private investment in renewable energy and green growth.

The India Lab has recently opened its call for ideas for the next wave of cutting-edge finance instruments for the 2016-2017 cycle, in the areas of renewable energy, energy efficiency, and public transport. Interested parties can visit www.climatefinanceideas.org. The deadline to submit an idea is December 23rd.

The India Lab is comprised of 29 public and private Lab Members who help develop and support the Lab instruments, including the Indian Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, the Ministry of Finance, the Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency (IREDA), the Asian Development Bank, the World Bank, and the development agencies of the French, UK, and US governments.

In October 2016, the India Lab launched its inaugural three innovative green finance instruments, after a year of stress-testing and development under the 2015-2016 cycle. They will now move forward for piloting in India with the support of the Lab Members. The three instruments include a rooftop solar financing facility, a peer-to-peer lending platform for green investments, and a currency exchange hedging instrument. Together, they could mobilize private investment of more than USD $2 billion to India’s renewable energy targets.

Now that the Paris Agreement has been ratified and the real work begins, the India Innovation Lab for Green Finance can help India transition from talk to action by driving needed private investment to its renewable energy targets. Visit www.climatefinanceideas.org to learn more and submit your innovative green finance idea by December 23rd.

A version of this first appeared in the Huffington Post.

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National-level climate finance tracking can help countries meet NDC goals effectively

November 10, 2016 |

 

Around the world, 74% of total global climate finance and over 90% of total private climate finance is raised and spent in the same country. As low-carbon, climate-resilient assets become increasingly attractive to national actors compared to the alternatives, action on climate is largely happening within national contexts.

In fact, the domestic bias of climate finance is likely understated. CPI’s Global Landscape of Climate Finance reports have repeatedly highlighted substantial data gaps around domestic budgets in particular.

In 2014, the majority of global climate finance was raised and spent in the same country. Because domestic investment dominates, it is vital to get policies right. This requires robust national-level climate finance tracking.

The majority of finance was raised and spent in the same country. Because domestic investment dominates, it is vital to get policies right. This requires robust national-level climate finance tracking.

Clearly, understanding how finance flows within countries is key to accelerating countries’ transitions toward low-carbon and climate-resilient economies.
CPI has worked with counterparts in Germany, Indonesia and most recently Côte d’Ivoire to track their climate finance and other organizations are also tracking climate finance at the national level. For example, Institute for Climate Economics (I4CE) used CPI’s approach as a foundation to conduct a similar exercises in France, Trinomics has done similar work in Belgium, and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has worked with seven Asia-Pacific countries to understand climate-related public expenditures in their national budgets.

While these countries have made a start, more work is urgently needed as improved national tracking will critically inform countries’ efforts to implement their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) submitted under the Paris Agreement. The International Energy Agency (IEA) has estimated that, to implement NDCs, energy efficiency and low-carbon technologies require$13.5 trillion in investment over the next 15 years. Ensuring that investment from a range of national and international sources is optimized will help ensure impact and value for money.

There are many benefits to improving national-level climate finance tracking systems

Identifying, tagging, and tracking budget allocations that respond to climate change challenges enhances governments’ ability to allocate appropriate resources at the national and local levels and ensure they are being spent as intended.

Increasing understanding of what different domestic and international, public and private actors are investing, in which climate-relevant activities, and what instruments they are using to deliver finance, can help identify blockages, and highlight opportunities to better coordinate spending and reallocate finance to areas where it will have more impact.

Extending the scope of tracking exercises beyond climate finance can reveal how much public money is flowing to support business-as-usual investments including in fossil fuels, and unsustainable land use. Understanding where public incentives are misaligned with climate goals can highlight opportunities to improve policies and ensure public spending is coherent.

CPI has designed related tools to inform decision makers thinking around this broader question and is applying them in the context of REDD+ related finance in Côte d’Ivoire to support the country’s work to develop a REDD+ strategy.

Ultimately, such tracking provides a basis for decision makers to ensure that limited domestic and international public resources are targeted where and how they are needed most to help countries achieve their goals. Effective tracking provides a starting point to inform discussions about what is happening, and informs the design of more cost-effective policies and financial instruments to mobilize investment.

CPI remains committed to improving understanding of climate finance flows at the national and local levels.

Since 2010, CPI has supported decision makers from the public and private sectors, at international, national and local levels, to define and track how climate finance is flowing from sources and actors, through a range of financial instruments, to recipients and end uses. Providing decision makers with robust and comprehensive information helps them to assess progress against real investment goals and needs. It also improves understanding of how public policy, finance and support interact with, and drive climate-relevant investment from diverse private actors, and where opportunities exist to achieve greater scale and impact.

This blog is part of a series on climate finance tracking challenges. Read more here.

Click here to sign up for updates on this and other aspects of our work.

If you would like our support tracking your climate finance flows, get in touch here.

This article first appeared on Public Finance International.

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Geothermal: Risks shouldn’t overshadow benefits

November 12, 2014 |

 

Geothermal is competitive. Its low cost per unit of energy generated, when compared with other renewable energies and fossil-fuelled generation make it an attractive option for policy-makers in developing countries to meet growing energy demand.

It is also compatible with energy grid needs. Its high capacity factor and its ability to continuously feed into the energy system makes it particularly suitable for reliable baseload production while its potential flexibility makes it suitable to respond to fluctuating supply from technologies such as wind and solar PV depending on a power grid’s needs.

Geothermal costs compared to other energy technologies Cost comparisons between energy technologies show that geothermal requires high up front investment but can provide low cost power

However, risks in the early exploration and drilling phases, combined with high investment costs, have slowed the scale up of the technology and limited the private investment that is needed if geothermal is to play a bigger role in the energy system. Climate Policy Initiative’s (CPI) recently published analysis of global geothermal markets and financing models finds that public finance plays the most prominent role in financing geothermal. 76-90% of all project investments utilize some aspect of public debt or equity support, as well as support instruments.

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Video: New business models for a low-carbon electricity system in the U.S. and Europe can save billions

November 10, 2014 |

 

New finance and business models for a low-carbon electricity system in the U.S. and Europe can save consumers, investors, and taxpayers billions. Watch the video or read the analysis to learn more.

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International public finance supports South Africa’s deployment of concentrated solar power

August 21, 2014 |

 

Among emerging economies, South Africa has particular potential for solar power because of the country’s excellent solar resources. While fossil fuel power generation currently provides over 90% of its electricity, South Africa is seeking to reduce its reliance on carbon-intensive coal-based energy.

The Government of South Africa (GoSA) has developed policies to transition to a clean and sustainable energy system. In order to exploit its abundant renewable energy resources, South Africa has adopted an ambitious plan to add 20 GW of new renewable power generation capacity by 2030 (almost 50% of current generation capacity). Of this, 3.3 GW is expected to be from concentrated solar power (CSP). This is approximately equal to the current installed capacity of CSP worldwide.

CSP: A promising technology for low-carbon energy systems
CSP is a promising energy technology for low-carbon energy systems as, in combination with thermal storage, it can store solar energy in the form of heat to deliver clean power when it is most needed. It offers a real chance to act as a viable substitute for coal-based energy. Despite its potential, CSP technology lacks a long deployment track record and still comes with high technology risks, which translate to higher financing and overall costs. This means that most projects need public assistance in the form of low-cost public finance or political support to be bankable.

South Africa’s state-owned electricity utility Eskom is currently planning to install its first CSP power plant in Upington in the Northern Cape region of South Africa. In a recent Climate Policy Initiative (CPI) case study, conducted with support from the Climate Investment Funds Administrative Unit, CPI examined this plant to understand how public support helped advance this project. It also looks at the financial and technological challenges for Eskom and the reasons behind the extended project development time.

Eskom CSP plant in Upington now back on track
Eskom CSP remains one of the most ambitious CSP power tower projects under development anywhere outside of the U.S. with respect to its technology choice, capacity and storage. After several years in development, the project was placed on hold in 2009 during the global recession, largely because reduced access to capital and increased pressure from GoSA to improve the country’s energy security at low cost led Eskom to reassess its investment priorities.

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With new market structures and business models, consumers can help states reduce carbon emissions

July 8, 2014 |

 

On June 2, in a historic move towards addressing CO2’s climate impacts, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its Clean Power Plan proposed rule for regulating carbon emissions from existing power plants. The regulations encourage states to take advantage of a range of CO2-reducing methods, like energy efficiency and renewable energy, rather than requiring all emissions reductions to occur at the power plants themselves. Electricity consumers can play an important role in states’ plans to meet the regulations, if regulators can take advantage of all the resources they can provide. Fully utilizing consumers’ electrical resources may require the help of new market structures and business models.

The value that individuals, households, and businesses can provide to the electric grid could be quite significant. Technologies such as rooftop solar panels, “smart” thermostats, more efficient appliances, and electric vehicles, especially when combined with smart meters and other smart grid technologies, could enable consumers to reduce the demands on the grid at peak times and help absorb excess generation from renewable generation when demand is low. As CPI discusses in our Roadmap to a Low Carbon Electricity System, many factors are already conspiring to make these consumer-level resources more valuable and accessible.

Wise use of these so-called distributed energy resources could replace some of the fossil-fuel power plants that would otherwise be needed to balance a renewable-generation-heavy grid, creating cost-effective emissions reductions. They could even make the grid more resilient to future severe weather.

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How to spread new technology in agriculture: the importance of geographic conditions and learning-from-peers

November 7, 2013 |

 

In business, it is unusual to find a technology that proves to be better and costs less than the one in use. In theory, that technology should spread like wildfire and quickly replace current production methods. If it doesn’t, there is usually a barrier that prevents its spread.

In a new CPI study, we examine a farming technology called the Direct Planting System (DPS) which has proven to be one of the most important developments in agriculture in the past decades – however, after nearly forty years of its introduction in Southern Brazil, only 10% of Brazilian farmers reported using it in the 2006 Agricultural Census. The questions we address in this study are: What is keeping this technology from spreading and how do we overcome this barrier?

Our analysis reveals that soil composition is an important factor affecting the spread of the DPS. When soils are similar in a given municipality, it is easier for farmers to learn from the experience of peers who have already successfully adopted the system. Likewise, differences in the soil can act as a barrier to the expansion of DPS, since the system would have to be adapted to different soils. 

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China’s Path to Low-Carbon Development: A Q&A with Thomas C. Heller

August 14, 2013 |

 

This interview discussing the challenges China faces on its path to low-carbon development  and parallels with other countries’ experiences first appeared in Mandarin in the China Economic Times. In it, our executive director, Thomas C. Heller, references CPI’s recent publication The Policy Climate, which presents 30 years of climate and energy policy in China, Brazil, India, the EU, and the U.S..

Reporter: Why did you undertake this report and what was most surprising about your findings?

Heller: A lot of the attention to date has been on international climate negotiations, but actually, there’s more action at the national level. We wanted to examine climate and energy policies in key regions around the world, and share lessons about their experience. It was interesting to see how much nations had in common. All nations want green growth. And they face the same choices about how to get there. China has a very different governance and economic system from other countries, but like other countries, it faces the same decisions on how to balance national and regional policies, whether to use mandates or incentives, how to target large as well as small enterprises. Our report talks about some of these common challenges.

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China at an energy crossroads

April 29, 2013 |

 

As the second largest economy in the world, China’s energy demand is growing at a speed never seen before, representing more than 80% of the growth in both oil and coal consumption internationally in the past few years. When a country is developing at this scale, anything it does will have huge implications on a variety of global issues, from energy markets, commodity prices, energy security, to climate change.

However, people trying to understand what energy path the country is heading toward are often puzzled by the complexity of the picture: On the one hand, the country is the biggest emitter and the largest net importer of coal. On the other, China also leads renewable energy manufacture and installation, and has helped push down the cost of renewable generation globally.

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