Tag Archives: San Giorgio Group

Improved and integrated private disclosure data can help broader tracking efforts

November 8, 2016 |

 

As part of efforts to limit the increase in the global average temperature to well below 2°C, the Paris Agreement states that countries participating in the international climate negotiations shall make ‘finance flows consistent with a pathway towards low greenhouse gas emissions and climate-resilient development’.

CPI’s Global Landscape of Climate Finance and San Giorgio Group Case Studies have highlighted the important role of public resources and policies in influencing growth pathways. However, while data collection at the international level has improved in recent years (for example through the OECD DAC system), many governments and public organizations still lack a comprehensive system to track and report domestic climate-related expenditures and international climate finance.

In terms of collecting and publically reporting information about its climate finance investments, the private sector lags even further behind.

Integrated private disclosure data - Finance captured by Global Landscape of Climate Finance 2015 and data gaps

This is problematic for governments and investors alike. Exposure to climate risks will have widespread effects on the value of assets and therefore, the ability of pension funds and insurance companies to pay out to their beneficiaries. Costs of compliance with standards or policies, risks of stranded assets, changing agricultural and commodity prices, increased scarcity of essential resources like water, disruptions in business supply chains, and damage to infrastructure and other assets will all impact companies’ and investors’ financial performance, as well as countries’ economic growth.

Investors are gaining more clarity on the exposure of their financial assets to climate change risk through companies’ increasing disclosure of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) data. To date, demand for companies to disclose the climate risks they face has mainly been driven by disclosure initiatives and pressure from investors, with mandates from financial regulators and exchanges increasing in importance.

However, as CPI analysis has shown, there is little consistency in the quality and scope of information disclosed. Definitions are applied in different ways and many metrics are preliminary. Last December, the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) reported that 93% of listed U.S. companies face some degree of climate risk but only 12% have disclosed it.

The challenge in the medium-term is to harmonize and improve definitions and metrics to provide investors and policymakers with comparable and reliable data with which to compare performance and formulate investment policies. Forthcoming recommendations on how to standardise such disclosures from the Taskforce on Climate-Related Financial Disclosures are due in December could provide some guidance. In the short-term, increased transparency is a good start.

Green bonds provide a case in point. Concerns about where finance raised from these bonds goes have led a number of different organizations to develop different assurance solutions. However, recent trends show issuers may be choosing transparency as the least cost option.

In 2015, 72% of green bond market by value sought an independent review. In the third quarter of this year, less than half did so, with issuers themselves opting instead to disclose how the proceeds of bonds will be used, and their process for selecting green projects.

Investors in the market seem broadly satisfied with this for now but this could change.

French investors now face their own for disclosure requirements both on how they are managing climate risk and how they are contributing to “energy and ecological transitions.” A French law, the first to introduce mandatory carbon reporting by investors, requires investors with a balance sheet of €500 million or more to submit their first reports on how they are approaching these issues by June 2017.

What remains less clear is whether such disclosure will provide enough comparable and reliable detail on the kind, location and performance of assets (e.g. in terms of emissions reductions, increased energy productivity, or increased resilience to adverse weather conditions) to provide more comprehensive overviews of how finance is accommodating climate change impacts and opportunities.

While some questions remain, increased transparency will certainly support investors and regulators’ efforts to mainstream ESG investment, and to move from understanding to managing climate risk, thus optimizing climate-related investment opportunities.

Increased transparency will also open new opportunities for financial product and service providers to refine existing and create new green investment products that reduce capital costs for the organizations driving energy and land use transitions.

Integrated private disclosure data - Investment framework for managing climate risks and opportunities

Greater clarity on public and private finance flowing to climate-relevant sectors where little reliable information is currently available can also improve policymakers’ understanding of how public and private interests and capabilities interact, enabling them to refine support frameworks to ensure effective spending and to maximise the economic benefits of transitions in energy and land use.

CPI remains committed to supporting investors to improve their understanding of climate risks and highlighting how to make the most of the opportunities presented by countries’ transitions to low-carbon and climate-resilient economies.

Since 2010, CPI has supported decision makers from the public and private sectors, at international, national and local levels, to define and track how climate finance is flowing from sources and actors, through a range of financial instruments, to recipients and end uses. Providing decision makers with robust and comprehensive information helps them to assess progress against real investment goals and needs. It also improves understanding of how public policy, finance and support interact with, and drive climate-relevant investment from diverse private actors, and where opportunities exist to achieve greater scale and impact.

This blog is part of a series on climate finance tracking challenges. Read more here.

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Is concentrated solar power getting any cheaper? And what role can policy play in bringing costs down?

January 22, 2014 |

 

In the past, renewable energy technologies have been much more expensive than their fossil fuel competitors but costs of wind and solar have come down after public support has deployed them at scale. In fact, costs of solar photovoltaic power plants have decreased roughly 20% and wind power plants 15% every time installed capacity has doubled.

For concentrated solar power (CSP), experts have projected a cost reduction of 10-15% for every doubling of capacity. However, new CPI analysis shows that CSP has not demonstrated cost reductions at the global level with increased deployment over the last five years, but it has done so in some regions for some CSP technologies.

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Why risk coverage matters and what can be done to scale up green investment

December 6, 2013 |

 

Risk, whether real or perceived, matters. It is the biggest barrier preventing private capital from flowing into investments and, given the enhanced risk profile of low-carbon technologies, it is even more crucial for climate finance investments. Higher risks demand higher returns and higher financing costs, making low-carbon technologies even less competitive.

While not all risks need to be reallocated, whenever risk falls onto a party not suited or not willing to bear it, risk coverage instruments (such as guarantees) can be key to unlocking private resources without depleting public budgets.

CPI has observed this phenomenon time and time again in our case studies.

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Engaging the private sector in climate change adaptation: Early evidence from the Pilot Program on Climate Resilience

November 5, 2013 |

 

Investment in projects that help countries adapt to climate change attracted around USD 20-24 billion in 2012, according to CPI’s recently published Global Landscape of Climate Finance 2013.  However, due to data gaps and limited understanding of private sector adaptation efforts, the Landscape 2013 only tracks public adaptation finance.

While difficult to track, private sector investments in adaptation are critical to scale up climate finance efforts to the levels required by projected needs. Private actors, however, are not fully aware about climate-related risks and opportunities, even if climate change can directly affect their assets and revenues. Knowledge, technical, financial, and risk barriers can hinder their engagement.

The public sector can play a role in helping to overcome these obstacles. To better understand how public resources can be deployed to engage private actors in building countries’ climate resilience, a forthcoming San Giorgio Group case study explores approaches taken on-the-ground by the Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) in the Nepalese agricultural sector.

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Climate finance untangled

February 20, 2013 |

 

This piece originally appeared on the World Bank blog and is cross-posted here.

Landscape-LargeGlobal leaders have spoken strongly on the urgent need for climate action, putting it back on top of the 2013 agenda. During his inaugural address and State of the Union speech, President Obama gave clear signals about his intentions to address this issue in his second term. At the World Economic Forum in Davos, president of the World Bank Group Jim Yong Kim reminded economic leaders about the potentially devastating impacts that could occur in a world 4°C warmer by the end of the century.

Unlocking finance is an essential part of avoiding that future. But, before leaders can determine how much more money is needed, they need to establish how much is already flowing, what the main sources are, and where it’s going.

These are the key questions my team and I at Climate Policy Initiative aimed to answer with the release of the “The Landscape of Climate Finance 2012”. Our analysis estimated global climate finance flows at an average $364 billion in 2011. To put this in context, according to the International Energy Agency, the world needs $1 trillion a year over 2012 to 2050 to finance a low-emissions transition, so current finance flows still fall far short of what is needed.

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Expanding green finance: What’s already working and what’s next?

December 5, 2012 |

 

Despite reaching $364 billion in 2010/2011, global investment to combat climate change still falls far short of the level required to stabilize global temperature rise to 2°C. According to the IEA, we need to reach $1 trillion each year of incremental investment in energy supply and demand technologies, and more will be needed to achieve climate resilient development globally.

Policymakers and others will need to scale up what’s working, and explore new approaches to pool more capital from the private sector. However, investors’ real and perceived risks are increasing as a result of stalled international negotiations and national policy frameworks reforms.

On the 20th and the 21st September, Climate Policy Initiative hosted the Second Meeting of the San Giorgio Group (SGG) on the island of San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice to discuss what’s already working in green finance, what’s not working, and to identify new options to bridge the gap between supply of climate investment and the demand for mitigation and adaptation finance. Here is a summary of some of the highlights.

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